Tuffield “Tuffy” Latour

Tuffield “Tuffy” Latour

Tuffield Latour

Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Management, 2010

“Ashford offered me the ability to take classes while on the road.”

In 1990, Tuffield “Tuffy” Latour answered a solicitation in an Air Force newspaper for active duty airmen to try out for the U.S. Bobsled team. “I started sliding that year driving bobsleds and raced for the next eight years,” Tuffy explains. In 1998, he started coaching bobsled and has never looked back.

Now an Air Force Sergeant, this Ashford alum has coached in the last four games and has led six U.S. and Canadian athletes to medals. In Salt Lake City in 2002, he was the driving coach for the US Women’s Bobsled Team; in 2006 in Torino, he was the U.S. Men’s Bobsled Team head coach; and in 2010 in Vancouver, he was the head coach for the Canadian men’s and women’s bobsled teams. Later that year, he took the job as the head coach for the U.S. Skeleton Team.

On the world stage in Sochi in 2014, he led members of the U.S. men’s and women’s skeleton teams to two medals (a silver in the women's skeleton event and a bronze in the men’s event). Several of his other athletes placed respectably as well. He found the Sochi sliding facilities to be world-class and the entire experience extremely positive.

Serving our country not only at the world’s most prestigious athletic event but also in the military means that Tuffy is involved in the US Army World Class Athlete Program (WCAP). WCAP provides outstanding soldier-athletes the support and training to compete and succeed in national and international competitions leading to the games, while maintaining a professional military career and promoting the US Army to the world. “I got involved in WCAP in 1995 shortly after I joined the Vermont Army National Guard. As a soldier, it’s always an honor to be able to serve and represent your country at the . . . games.”

Tuffy enrolled at Ashford in 2007 right after taking the Head Coach position with the Canadian bobsled team. “Ashford offered me the ability to take classes while on the road. As a bobsled and skeleton coach, we travel quite a lot in the winter months, which leaves flexibility as a must for any working adult. I really enjoyed my time at Ashford. I feel that I learned a lot, as I was able to relate quite a bit to the Organizational Management degree I was pursuing.”

Tuffy has continued to juggle many roles successfully, although he points out, “As a husband, father, soldier, student, and coach, I’ve always had my hands full. It’s amazing how time flies by when you’re trying to juggle so many areas of life.”

His advice to Ashford students and alumni is as follows: “Follow your dreams, never give up, and when it gets tough, push through it. I always tell my athletes to focus on the process. Part of that belief system is to take it one curve at a time, which in turn allows the athletes to stay process-oriented.”