Courses

Online English Degree Courses

Read and appreciate great books. Analyze how language and literature shape culture and identity. Your courses include theory, linguistics, and composition, in addition to surveys of American and British literature.

Introductory Courses *


All Bachelor degree-seeking students with zero (0) traditional college-level transferable credits are required to successfully complete the Student Success Orientation prior to enrolling in credit-bearing coursework. Following successful completion of orientation, students are required to successfully complete EXP 105 Personal Dimensions of Education as their first course. Students entering with twenty-four (24) or more transferable, traditional semester credits are required to successfully complete PSY 202 Adult Development and Life Assessment as their first course. PSY 202 is designed to help experienced students acclimate to the online college environment.

Student Success Orientation 

The orientation is designed to provide students with a complete overview of the Ashford University experience, prepare them for success in their courses, and help them to self evaluate their readiness to succeed in an online classroom setting. Students will be instructed on Ashford University policies and the learner resources that are available to them through interactive videos and assessments. Students enrolled in orientation must successfully complete all assigned activities.

EXP 105 Personal Dimensions of Education 

This course is designed to help adult learners beginning their university studies to achieve academic success. Students will explore learning theories, communication strategies, and personal management skills. Adult learners will develop strategies for achieving success in school and work. Students will also be introduced to the University's institutional outcomes and learning resources. Effective for courses beginning January 1, 2013, and after, a minimum grade of C- is required to meet course requirements.

PSY 202 Adult Development & Life Assessment 

This course presents adult development theory and links theoretical concepts of life and learning through a process of psychometric assessment and reflection. Both classical and contemporary adult development theories are examined. These theories then provide the paradigm for self-analysis and life learning, including a plan for personal, professional and academic learning. Effective for courses beginning January 1, 2013, and after, a minimum grade of C- is required to meet course requirements.

Major Course Requirements


(36 credits, all courses are 3 credits unless otherwise indicated. Courses are listed in the recommended sequence.)

ENG 341 Studies in Literary Genres
This course will introduce students to literary genres such as poetry, short fiction, creative non-fiction, drama, and the novel. Students will read, analyze, and write critically about representative selections in the various genres.

ENG 201 American Literature to 1865
This course will examine American literature from early colonization through 1865, including texts from the colonial, revolutionary, and antebellum periods. The focus will be upon literary analysis and literary movements contextualized by American history and culture.

ENG 202 American Literature after 1865
This course will examine American literature focusing on a selection of works published between 1865 and the present. We will explore the impact of social and cultural transformations on our national literature working through literary movements and paying close attention to the development of ideas about gender, race, region and nation as expressed in fiction, poetry, and drama.

ENG 345 British Literature I
This course examines British literature from the Old English period through the Age of Reason.

ENG 346 British Literature II
A survey of the British literature from the Romantic Period through the early part of the 20th Century.

ENG 325 Intermediate Composition
Intermediate Composition is designed for students who have some experience with college-level writing but want to develop their ability to write. The goal of this course is to help students learn techniques for writing effective narrative, reflective, analytical, and research essays. These techniques include the effective use of specific details to engage and persuade readers, methods of organization that enable readers to follow a line of thinking, and strategies for editing sentences for clarity and concision.

ENG 321 Introductory Linguistics
This course provides students with an introduction to the principles and methods of linguistic theory. Basic concepts included are phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. The developmental stages of language acquisition and the variations of dialect and style observed in spoken and written English are also examined. Students practice applying linguistic theory to explain language-related phenomena encountered in everyday life.

ENG 317 International Voices
An introduction to recent international writing in its cultural context. Students read fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and interview, and are introduced to music, art, film, and cuisine of cultures beyond US borders.

ENG 380 Literary Research
This course is designed to teach the techniques for conducting literary research. Students will focus on particular authors while focusing on the essential skills of literary research. In addition to short critical essays, students will produce a major research paper.

ENG 318 Creative Writing
This course provides writing experiences in fiction, nonfiction or poetry for students who have a strong interest in creative expression and have some experience in writing in one of these genres. Various aspects of the imaginative process are explored with separate application made to the genres of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students choose one genre, participate in workshops with instructors, join with instructors and writing practitioners in critiquing colleagues' work, and make presentations of their own work.

ENG 438 Literary Theory
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and tools to develop an understanding the nature of literature, what functions is has, what the relation of the text is to the author, the reader, to language, to society and to history.

ENG 497 English Capstone
Students will demonstrate mastery of the concepts and methodology in the major by producing a final project that includes extensive research into the selected topic.

If this program fits your personal and professional goals, contact Ashford University at 866.711.1700 to learn more, or request additional information.