July 2010

July 2010

PAWs - Promoting Awareness and Wellness

Ashford University is proud to show you our PAWs. That is, our Promoting Awareness and Wellness initiative! Every month, we'll highlight different causes and opportunities that reflect the values of the University. You'll also learn ways that you can participate or be more involved.

July 2010

UV Safety Month
It's summertime! The sun is bright and you have a wonderful opportunity to be outside enjoying time with family and friends. Whether it is by the pool, at a barbeque, or attending a baseball game, fun times are sure to be had by all. However, these outdoor activities also increase the likelihood of prolonged exposure to the sun, and such exposure can damage your skin and eyes. Fortunately, July is UV Safety Month, a time to spread the message of sun, fun, and safety to your family, friends, and community.

The American Academy of Dermatology and the American Academy of Ophthalmology encourage everyone to protect their skin and eyes by applying sunscreen and wearing sunglasses and wide-brimmed hats when venturing out to spend a day in the sun.
Find additional information about UV Safety Month at: 
http://www.aao.org/aaoesite/eyemd/uv.cfm

The American Academy of Dermatology encourages you to Be Sun Smart
Protect yourself from the sun! Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for all skin cancers, including melanoma. You can enjoy the sun but also decrease your risk of skin cancer by following these 8 tips recommended by the American Academy of Dermatology:

  1. Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of 30 or more to all exposed skin. "Broad-spectrum" provides protection from both ultraviolet A (UV-A) and ultraviolet B (UV-B) rays. Reapply approximately every two hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.
  2. Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses.
  3. Seek shade when appropriate. Remember that the sun's rays are strongest between 10 am and 4 pm. If your shadow appears to be shorter than you are, seek shade.
  4. Protect children from sun exposure. Be sure to play in the shade, use protective clothing, and apply sunscreen.
  5. Use extra caution near water, snow, and sand because they reflect and intensify the damaging rays of the sun, which can increase your chances of sunburn.
  6. Get vitamin D safely through a healthy diet that may include vitamin supplements. Don't seek the sun.
  7. Avoid tanning beds. Ultraviolet light from the sun and tanning beds can cause skin cancer and wrinkling. If you want to look like you've been in the sun, consider using a sunless self-tanning product, but continue to use sunscreen with it.
  8. Check your birthday suit on your birthday. If you notice anything changing, growing, or bleeding on your skin, consult a dermatologist. Skin cancer is very treatable when caught early.

Find additional information about Skin Safety by visiting the American Academy of Dermatology's website at:
http://www.aad.org/
For information about protecting your eyes from the sun, view these helpful talking points provided by the American Academy of Ophthalmology.
Find additional information about Eye Safety by visiting the American Academy of Ophthalmology's website at:
http://www.aao.org/

Summer Wellness & Safety Tips
Spending an increased amount of time outside during the summer months usually means spending an increased amount of time in the heat. Prolonged exposure to heat presents a number of dangers to individuals both young and old.

The American Red Cross has provided the heat safety tips listed below. Following this advice will help you stay cool and healthy during the summer months.\

  1. Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing. Light colors will reflect away some of the sun's energy. It is also a good idea to wear a hat or use an umbrella.
  2. Drink water. Carry water or juice with you and drink continuously even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which dehydrate the body. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  3. Eat small meals and eat more often. Avoid high-protein foods, which increase metabolic heat.
  4. Slow down. Avoid strenuous activity. If you must do strenuous activity, do it during the coolest part of the day, which is usually in the morning between 4 am and 7 am.
  5. Stay indoors when possible. If air-conditioning is not available, stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine. Remember that electric fans do not cool, they simply circulate the air.
  6. Be a good neighbor. During heat waves, check in on elderly residents in your neighborhood and those who do not have air-conditioning.
  7. Learn Red Cross first aid and CPR.

Click here to find additional information about summer wellness and safety from the American Red Cross.

School's Out - Help Kids Stay Protected this Summer
For children, summertime means school is out and it's time to play! While video games and television may be tempting, warm weather and long days mean there is ample opportunity for kids to get outside and be active. Even if they require a bit of "parental encouragement," once they are outside it may be difficult to get them back inside. Swimming, biking, and skateboarding are just some of the activities that children are likely to engage in on a regular basis during the summer months.

to find additional information about summer wellness and safety from the American Red Cross. For children, summertime means school is out and it's time to play! While video games and television may be tempting, warm weather and long days mean there is ample opportunity for kids to get outside and be active. Even if they require a bit of "parental encouragement," once they are outside it may be difficult to get them back inside. Swimming, biking, and skateboarding are just some of the activities that children are likely to engage in on a regular basis during the summer months.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has provided a number of helpful safety tips related to summertime activities. Please click on the links below to access in-depth information about the following topics:

  • Heat stress in exercising children
  • Pool Safety
  • Bug Safety
  • Playground Safety
  • Bicycle Safety
  • Skateboard, Scooter, In-Line Skating, and Heelys Safety
  • Lawn Mower Safety
  • Fireworks Safety
  • Boating Safety
  • Open Water Swimming
  • All-Terrain Vehicles Safety

http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/summertips.cfm
http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/summertips-p2.cfm

*** Thanks to the American Academy of Dermatology, the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Red Cross for their knowledge and availability to share it with others***