Title
Ashford University Catalog

NUR Nursing

NUR 300 Professional Role Development and Practice in Nursing

3 Credits

This course focuses on the baccalaureate-prepared nurse’s role(s) in professional practice, and the alignment of nursing theories with practice and research. The course surveys important changes that have occurred in the nursing profession over the years, such as the ANCC Magnet Recognition Program. The course will cover quality and safety education for nurses (QSEN), the nursing scope of practice as defined by the American Nurses Association (ANA), the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) core competencies in collaborative care, nursing ethics, education, health promotion, and disease prevention, as they relate to professional nursing roles. Students will apply critical thinking, evidence-based practice (EBP), and continuous quality improvement (CQI) to professional nursing practice. This course includes 20 hours of practice experience activities. Prerequisites: ENG 328.

NUR 302 Transcultural Nursing Care

3 Credits

This course focuses on the differences and similarities among cultures with respect to human care, health, and illness and how these considerations apply to real-world nursing practices. Students enrolled in the course develop their scientific and humanistic knowledge by integrating their own history, life experiences, beliefs, and values and by assessing how these factors have the potential to impact the ways in which they provide culturally competent care. Prerequisite: NUR 300.

NUR 304 Health Assessment

3 Credits

This course prepares RN to BSN students to synthesize the comprehensive health assessment. Emphasis is placed on the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of data collected from clients of all ages. A physical, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual approach, which is supported by evidence-based practices is used to assess the client and to incorporate consideration of the client's needs, state of wellness, developmental level, and response to life experiences. Students also evaluate current health policy and technology to support health assessment to improve community health. Prerequisite: NUR 302.

NUR 306 Nursing Research

3 Credits

This course provides the scientific foundation for professional practice. It introduces the student to the basic research methodologies and statistical concepts, and qualitative, quantitative, and epidemiologic research designs. Research methods and findings are appraised and applied within the framework of evidence based professional practice. Research proposal development as a foundation for nursing inquiry is emphasized. . Prerequisite: NUR 300.

NUR 400 Family Health Nursing

3 Credits

Major theoretical models and frameworks for developing clinical skills in assessing, diagnosing, planning, implementing, and evaluating holistic nursing interventions across the family life cycle are presented. Contemporary issues related to diverse family structures, cultural and socioeconomic influences on access to and delivery of health care, and provision of culturally-competent family nursing care are emphasized. Knowledge and skill development in providing evidence-based nursing care and coordinating health care for families experiencing acute and chronic illnesses, including transitions in level of care and care settings, are reinforced. Community-based nursing assessment and interventions with physically-, psychologically-, and socially-vulnerable client populations within a family health context are explored. Prerequisites: NUR 304, NUR 306 and GRO 325.

NUR 402 Community Health Nursing

3 Credits

This course focuses on culturally diverse populations and aggregates in communities to achieve an optimum level of wellness. Special emphasis is placed on advanced theoretical concepts related to health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, and development processes. Students gain skills needed to influence policy and to support the changes in a community context. They examine healthcare reform and its impact on communities, evaluate policies that influence the structure, financing, and quality in health care, and examine healthcare delivery from a global perspective. Through discussions and other activities, students examine the effect of legal and regulatory processes on nursing practice, healthcare delivery, and population health outcomes as well as ways to advocate for promotion and preservation of population health. This course includes 20 hours of practice experience activities. Prerequisites: NUR 304 and NUR 306.

NUR 404 Nursing Care and Management of Chronic Illness and Disability

3 Credits

This course focuses on the interrelationship among functioning, health, and disability, which is analyzed within a biopsychosocial context. Pathophysiological, psychosocial, and functional aspects of chronic health conditions, across the lifespan and linked to the following physiological systems, are presented: respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal, renal, endocrine, immune/ inflammatory, hematological, and skeletal/integumentary. The Chronic Care Model (CCM), multidisciplinary care, and current therapeutic modalities and disease management for these conditions are explored. Development of evidence-based, community-focused chronic illness nursing assessment, care plans, and interventions, including care coordination strategies, is emphasized. Prerequisites: NUR 400 and NUR 402.

NUR 406 Leading and Managing in Nursing

3 Credits

To effectively transition from a clinical nursing role to leadership, nursing professionals must possess business savvy and specialty skills that allow them to meet the demands an evolving and changing industry while maintaining the caring competencies of the nursing profession. This course introduces and reinforces group-promoting teamwork, leadership, delegation, supervision, healthcare ethical decision-making processes, strategic planning, and business negotiation. This course includes 20 hours of practice experience activities. Prerequisites: NUR 304 and NUR 306.

NUR 492 Capstone I: Nursing Practice Improvement Inquiry

3 Credits

This course, and its companion, NUR 494, represent the culmination of learning in the nursing program, and provide students an opportunity to synthesize and demonstrate knowledge of biopsychosocial health alterations and health promotion with clients across multiple practice settings, with an emphasis on patient population/community practice, the importance of culture and diversity in nursing practice, health policy, knowledge of nursing leadership, intra- and inter-professional collaboration, ethics, and research. Integrated knowledge and skills will be demonstrated through the development of a capstone project proposal related to the identification and critical, evidence-based, research exploration of a nursing practice problem, and strategies for quality improvement in the areas of health informatics, leadership and management, or population/ community health. NUR 492 and NUR 494 includes 30 hours of practice experience activities. Prerequisites: NUR 404, NUR 406 and permission of the program chair.

NUR 494 Capstone II: Nursing Practice Improvement and Evaluation

3 Credits

Demonstration of integrated theoretical, research, and evidence-based practice knowledge and skills is foundational to the role of the professional, bachelor’s-prepared nurse. The student will utilize the capstone project proposal developed in NUR 492 to develop a comprehensive improvement plan for the identified nursing practice problem, which encompasses best practices utilizing: quality and safety in patient care, nursing informatics, health policy, community/population health, nursing leadership, ethical and professional standards, and integration of theory. The plan will include strategies for evaluating its identified outcomes. The project will highlight the knowledge gained of the professional nurse practice role, specialized patient population, and health care-practice setting. NUR 492 and NUR 494 includes 30 hours of practice experience activities. Prerequisites: NUR 492 and permission of the program chair.

OMM Organizational Management

OMM 612 Managing in Social Change

3 Credits

This course considers key aspects of social change in today’s complex and interdependent business world, analyzes their effect on how managers position their business enterprises, and identifies decision-making strategies that allow mission-driven organizations to contribute to social transformation. 

OMM 615 Strategies: Marketing/Advertising/Public Relations

3 Credits

This course explores practical ways to develop organizational communication plans that integrate marketing, advertising and public relations strategies. Emphasis is given to the dynamic process of managerial decision-making required to implement an integrated communication plan effectively in order to achieve organizational goals. 

OMM 618 Human Resources Management

3 Credits

This course is a study on managing people in the workplace, focusing on the important policies and processes associated with recruiting, hiring, training and evaluating personnel in order to achieve strategic organizational goals. 

OMM 622 Financial Decision-making

3 Credits

The course is designed to allow individuals who do not prepare accounting and financial documents to understand and use these documents as tools in effective managerial decision-making, control and planning. Topics include purposes of financial statements, analysis of financial statements using basic accounting concepts, budgeting, and financial accountability in an organization. 

OMM 640 Business Ethics & Social Responsibility

3 Credits

This course analyzes organizational, professional and personal ethics and creates a framework for exploring the social responsibilities of managers and organizational leaders. Various methodologies will be used to explore ways to encourage ethical development and moral behavior within organizational culture and to resolve business ethical issues and dilemmas. 

OMM 692 Organizational Management Strategy

3 Credits

This capstone course explores the formulation, implementation and maintenance of organizational strategic management. In the context of a globally competitive market, students will explore methods of directing an entire organization. Topics include: analysis of competitive position, value creation, developing systems-wide goals and objectives, and the creation of a strategic plan. This course is cumulative in nature, integrating knowledge and information attained while completing the entire program curriculum. 

ORG Organizational Leadership

ORG 5574 Criminal Justice Organizations & their Functions

3 Credits

In this course, the criminal justice process and its components are examined. Students will become familiar with the different organizations that the justice system comprises. The complexity of criminal justice processes functioning as a dynamic system of interrelated yet separate parts will also be studied. In addition, students will be introduced to the distinctions between the adult criminal justice and the juvenile justice system to gain an understanding of the different ways in which offenders are dealt with in each system.

ORG 5650 Contemporary Issues in Mental Health Care Compliance

3 Credits

This course familiarizes the student with major areas of compliance in the administration of mental health agencies. Through readings and exercises students will explore HIPAA, JCAHO, other accrediting bodies, grant compliance, insurance regulations and lobbying efforts on behalf of mental health systems of care. Other topics may also be examined as new issues arise.

ORG 6343 Intervention Strategies in Wellness Program

3 Credits

This course explores the various methodologies for assessing the needs of target populations through health risk assessments, biometric health screenings, medical insurance data, culture audits, and health interest surveys whose focus is to select appropriate interventions. Interventions covered will include organizational changes, integration of wellness initiatives with various departments and functions, utilizing current research, as well as health education and behavioral strategies. Efficacy of intervention strategies will be explored in terms of their ability to improve lifestyle, mental health, and enhanced organizational performance. Additional issues to be explored include information on our aging workforce, medical consumerism, and prevention of relapses. Students learn to prioritize and tailor the various interventions for organizations and will plan for involving a population in the health promotion interventions.

ORG 6499 Cultural Diversity & Individual Differences

3 Credits

This course provides a systematic review of the wide range of cultures and individual differences and the ways in which cultural mores, ethnocentrism, and factors such as matters of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, customs and cultures impact behavior of the individual themselves and of those around them. Through this course, students will better understand themselves and others, in terms of perceptions and behaviors.

ORG 6504 Leadership & Management

3 Credits

This course is an overview of essential principles and current issues in leadership and management theory and practice. Students explore the evolutionary progress of leadership and management theories and practices from early in the industrial age to the present. Students learn to distinguish effective management and leadership practices for different organizations and operating environments. This class will examine systematic approaches to leadership in the context of organizational culture and interpersonal factors such as leadership ethics, organizational mission, individual motivation, leadership power, organizational strategy, and team performance.

ORG 6520 Professional Ethics, Standards of Practice & Law

3 Credits

This course is a study of the ethical and legal issues confronting organizational leadership. Topics related to discrimination and anti-harassment, personnel selection procedures, standards for psychological testing, and social media will be explored. Students will learn principles of ethical decision-making and corporate social responsibility as well as explore the impact that major ethical and legal dilemmas create for organizations. Students will master the importance of non-discrimination and anti-harassment legal principles including affirmative action, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1991, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972 through the study of laws and relevant court decisions. Students will also master the current code of ethics of the American Psychological Association and other relevant professional code of ethics. Students will further master essential consumer protection principles.

ORG 6522 Fundamentals of Coaching

3 Credits

This course will examine and analyze essential constructs and practices of effective executive coaching. It will focus on cutting edge executive coaching models, various coaching orientations, tools, and techniques of effective coaching. Students will get practice in basic skills in coaching such as establishing rapport and purpose, effective listening skills, giving effective feedback, and goal setting. The course also explores legal and ethical issues in the application and practice of executive coaching.

ORG 6570 Victimology: Theory, Research & Policy

3 Credits

To broaden the student's understanding of criminal events, this course explores the impact of crime on victims, both in relation to the criminal event itself as well as its aftermath, when criminal justice agencies become involved. The student is also introduced to various viewpoints on trauma effects of victimization, responses to victimization, and media intervention. In addition, the course examines the role and participation of victims in the processing of criminal cases.

ORG 6660 Fiscal Administration in Mental Health Care Systems

3 Credits

This course explores the common metrics organizations use, the data used in support of those metrics, the assessment of fiscal outcomes, trends and events. Identifying cost centers and programs is considered. Students will evaluate differing funding streams that could potentially support the provision of services including public funding, public insurance programs (e.g., Medicaid, Medicare), government and foundation grants, and private donations. Fundraising efforts as applied to an overall budget strategy will also be considered.

ORG 7101 Assessment Tools for Organizational Leadership

3 Credits

This course involves the study of the theory and practice of objective personality assessment and its application to executive coaching and organizational leadership. The course focuses on how objective personality assessment is used to provide insights into readiness for leadership and management roles. Primary emphasis is on those published instruments and inventories commonly used in executive coaching, organizational leadership assessment and organizational development, including instruments such as: FIRO-B, Social Style Profile, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, CPI 260, Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode, Campbell Leadership Index, Workplace Big Five, Change Style Indicator, Campbell Organizational Survey, and Conflicts Dynamics Profile. (All of the above will not necessarily be included in each session of the course; instructors will select representative examples from classes of instruments.)

ORG 7272 Group Process & Group Leadership in Organizations

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of group theory, processes, and dynamics in organizations. It will also examine effective behaviors and characteristics of facilitating/leading groups in an organizational setting. Students will be afforded the opportunity to participate in group simulations both as participant and facilitator. Students will receive evaluation and feedback on their group facilitation skills. A strong emphasis is placed on ethical standards and behavior in groups along with legal issues. The impact on groups of factors such as diversity, culture, distance, and others are explored.

ORG 7343 Advanced Intervention Strategies in Wellness Programming

3 Credits

This course examines the full range of intervention strategies and learning modalities for promoting health and wellness. Students will explore the most updated and proven theories for achieving strong employee participation, improving lifestyles and health outcomes, as well as for reducing health care costs. Students will analyze and plan advanced interventions for new wellness programs and mature wellness programs. Additional topics in this advanced course will cover recent issues in health care such as the impact of an aging population, use of incentives, injury prevention, and medical consumerism. Students will conduct a survey of relevant research to determine suitable environments and conditions for integration of current best practices.

ORG 7356 Integrative Medicine in Health Promotion Programs

3 Credits

This course examines recent advances in traditional and nontraditional research that have led to new ways of thinking about well-being and illness. Drawing on fields such as neuroscience, positive psychology, and interdisciplinary consciousness studies, students will enhance their awareness of ways to promote exceptional health habits through self-awareness and enlightenment. Students will also conduct in-depth studies of advanced research and theories that integrate mind-body practices beneficial to the health of individuals, groups, and organizations alike. Advanced practices in the areas of performance, health psychology, energy healing, indigenous, and Eastern medicine will be explored. Students will assess the efficacy and appropriateness of various practices to know which of them to incorporate into health promotion programs. The Health and Wellness Psychology student will be well-informed about the ramifications of nutrient deficiency, and that there is a fourth aspect of well-being besides (a) stress management, (b) dietary choices, and (c) exercise regimen. This fourth aspect is (d) dietary supplementation with the goal of counter-balancing nutrient deficiency. The safety of dietary supplements is explored, along with the differences between synthetic, natural and organic supplements.

ORG 7525 Issues & Methods in Market Research

3 Credits

This advanced workshop explores current techniques in mass market and Internet market research, with an emphasis on state of the art methods and issues facing practitioners. The course explores the social psychology of creating and supplying demand for products and services, by applying qualitative and quantitative research methods in both traditional retail and business distribution channels as well as through the Internet. Topics include market segmentation, product feature targeting, packaging, pricing, bundling, and placement, as well as advertising through direct mail, email, Internet, electronic mass media, and print media.

ORG 7650 Organizational Systems & Conflict Theorie

3 Credits

Systems theory involves an orientation to the unified whole of any system in which human beings find themselves. The emphasis will be on integrating theory and concepts from the behavioral and social sciences as a basis for understanding human behavior within organizations and resulting conflict from that behavior. Experiential exercises will augment theoretical learning.

ORG 7701 Theoretical Foundations for Diversity Work

3 Credits

This course will review the theoretical underpinnings for diversity work in the United States. Students will consider the implications of different models and explore what diversity means as a developing field. The course explores multi-disciplinary scholars, practitioners and theorists (academic, public policy, organizational, and others) to formulate discussion, analysis and experiment in the concept of diversity as a framework for organizational success.

ORG 7705 Advanced Topics in Cross-Cultural Communications

3 Credits

This advanced course in cross-cultural communication will focus on the natural tensions that exist when conducting business globally. Within a framework of transnational business and global economics, students will address contemporary concerns that apply to strategic alliances and the management of the globally diverse organization. Topics covered include the achievements of global leaders, characteristics of leaders, leading across cultures, leading change and relationship between leaders and followers.

ORG 7710 Cross-Functional Diversity Alignment

3 Credits

Promoting an organizational environment that fosters diversity requires aligning to and with organizational values, missions and visions. This course provides an overview of the organizational system including the design, control, and improvement of business systems. Topics include operations strategy, marketing and public relations, the legal landscape, principles of measuring organizational results, quality management, affirmative action and its role with Human Resources, as well as supplier diversity management.

ORG 8061 Administration of Grants & Contracts: Government & Community Funding

3 Credits

This course provides students with knowledge of the various types of funding sources, including government agencies, private and community sources, grants and contracts as well as rules, guidelines and typical procedures applied to gaining and managing funding. The course also includes basic skill building in using social capital to develop funding sources and in grant proposal development. Interagency collaboration is emphasized.

ORG 8160 Mental Health Programs & Services for Special Populations

3 Credits

This course covers the unique mental health service programming options for individuals representing special populations, including individuals with traumatic brain injury, mental retardation/developmental disabilities, co-occurring disorders, physical disabilities, individuals who are homeless, individuals in distressed communities, etc. The impact of family systems is also considered.

ORG 8165 Mental Health in the Context of Community Wellness

3 Credits

This course is designed to present the student with methods of conducting needs analysis, developing presentation activities, and programs to promote positive mental health. Interaction with, and promotion within the community, is also an area of focus. Methods of conducting and presenting results of cost-benefit analysis of community mental wellness programs are also covered. Prevention and wellness programs are discussed.

ORG 8201 Learning Strategies in Organizations

3 Credits

This course explores aligning organizational learning and business strategies. Students will explore current issues in this area, including different approaches that organizations take to planning, implementing, managing, and evaluating training as well as factors that contribute to success. Topics include selecting the optimal combination of curricula and delivery modalities; choosing and implementing learning management systems, selecting and utilizing instructional technology tools; and evaluating the impact of learning programs on strategic organizational performance.

ORG 8205 Training Needs Assessment Models & Methods

3 Credits

This course focuses on the process of applying research design models and methodologies to the analysis of performance problems or opportunities for organizations, teams or individual workers. Students will develop and apply a variety of systematic measurement tools, including extant (existing) data research, surveys, benchmarking, and focus groups while conducting performance and root cause analysis in the context of needs assessments or front end analysis.

ORG 8210 Training Evaluation Models & Methods

3 Credits

This course presents approaches to utilizing quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of training programs. Models/methods will include Kirkpatrick’s levels of evaluation, Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method, Phillip’s ROI method, and new developments in TDR (Talent Development Reporting).

ORG 8213 Strategic Talent Development

3 Credits

This course focuses on the role of the training function as it relates to strategic talent development utilizing an evidence-based approach. Students will learn how to integrate and align a development strategy with the long-term goals and needs of the organization. Connections will be made to tools and methods utilized for performance management, identification of high-potential leaders, and succession planning. Topics will include the increasing demand for leadership development and executive coaching.

ORG 8270 Diversity & Inclusion - Research in Action

3 Credits

In this course, students will conduct an action research project to help select the appropriate interventions related to diversity and inclusion. It is critical that when designing plans, students understand the role that different solutions have toward meeting organizational goals. Students will first begin by defining diversity and inclusion and how the definitions relate to organizational solutions. Then, they will explore approaches that organizations may take to assess and evaluate their needs, and to plan and then execute the appropriate response to support the organizational strategy. Topics will include: learning and development, training, communications, event planning, and community relations.

ORG 8300 International Comparison of Health Insurance Systems

3 Credits

This course examines healthcare delivery systems in various developed economies around the world. Content focuses on health insurance and other forms of healthcare financing, and means of providing efficient and effective healthcare to the general public. The course includes discussions of a variety of healthcare financing and healthcare delivery systems in countries around the world, some of which offer nationally financed programs, while others offer a combination of nationalized and private health care features. Pertinent issues related to healthcare financing and delivery systems located in the United States will be highlighted and analyzed. Topics include current issues and practices in the public policy related to financing and delivery of healthcare, preventative and wellness programs, access to healthcare, and quality of care.

ORG 8320 Environmental Stress on Mind & Body

3 Credits

This course addresses important aspects of environmental influences on health and wellness, such as exposure to industrial chemicals, environmental toxins in air and water due to excessive use of agricultural chemicals, as well as contaminates from radon, molds and cancer causing erionite exposure. A corporate health and wellness consultant needs to be familiar with basic environmental hazards that cause illness both in the private and corporate settings, as well as how to address the health and wellness needs of those whose health has already been compromised through environmental agents.

ORG 8340 Exploring the Self: Increasing the Efficiency of Helping Others

3 Credits

This course emphasizes the importance of reflecting on the self. The emphasis is on exploring unresolved shame, guilt, anger and interpersonal communication blunders, the role of forgiveness and making amends, along with negative and positive communication patterns as they help future health and wellness experts increase their effectiveness in advising and counseling employees, patients and clients in various organizational settings. The role of suppressing biased thinking is also addressed. The idea is that people who are able to address their own psychological needs are more efficient in helping others, than those who have unresolved issues.

ORG 8500 Advanced Topics in Organizational Consulting

3 Credits

This course focuses on the application of psychological principles to the workplace and how psychologists can facilitate the improvement of work environments, conditions, employee performance, and interpersonal/team functioning. In addition, the course provides a review of the basic theory, research, and practice in organizational training, development, and behavior. Topics covered include job performance and attitudes, work motivation, personnel selection and classification, group influence, and training and development. There is an emphasis on the contribution of specific psychological skills in organizational consultation.

ORG 8510 Advanced Seminar: Leading Organizational Change

3 Credits

This seminar examines cutting edge trends in organizational change, the current global business climate, forces driving change, and issues related to positioning organizations for the future. The topics selected will connect change with culture, existing organizational strategies, and the process of change in future directions. Major case study examples of organizational change are included in the learning process.

ORG 8511 Advanced Topics in Performance Management

3 Credits

This course takes a broad perspective on the theory and strategic application of performance management systems design and implementation, with an emphasis on the more complex issues and questions associated with these advanced systems. This advanced course explores strategic issues and best practices in employee engagement, leadership development, succession planning, evaluative performance feedback, and compensation models. The ways that the changing nature of work and changing demographics in the business world are influencing performance management systems are examined, including globalization, generational differences, multinational operations and cross-cultural issues. Based on current theories and applications for performance management systems, students explore current literature and case examples to implement and support organizational development and increased organizational effectiveness.

ORG 8512 Leadership & Organizational Cultures

3 Credits

This course addresses the key relationships among organizational culture, executing business strategy, structuring organizations into teams and workgroups, and aligning these with culture. The role of leaders in creating, maintaining, and changing culture gets special emphasis. The course includes current theories on the role of culture in organizational success and the role of leadership in guiding the organization and its culture toward successful outcomes.

ORG 8518 Professional & Business Ethics in Organizational Leadership

3 Credits

This advanced seminar examines enduring issues in business and professional ethics and applying proven approaches to ethical professional practice and organizational operations to contemporary organizational environments and issues.

ORG 8530 Influence, Motivation & Persuasion in the Workplace

3 Credits

This advanced graduate seminar explores theories of motivating adult performance in the workplace. The exploration includes theories and application of methods for leaders to influence and persuade others in ways that motivate and engage them in their work and their organization's mission.

ORG 8532 Advanced Seminar: The Leader as Coach

3 Credits

This advanced graduate seminar explores issues and models for leveraging human resources to execute business strategy. Topics include succession planning, leadership development models, workforce staffing models, compensation models, and training and development strategies.

ORG 8534 Advanced Seminar: Human Resources Business Strategy

3 Credits

This advanced graduate seminar explores issues and models for leveraging human resources to execute business strategy. Topics include succession planning, leadership development models, workforce staffing models, compensation models, and training and development strategies.

ORG 8542 Advanced Seminar: Learning Strategies in Organizations

3 Credits

This advanced seminar explores current topics in aligning educational and business strategy in organizations. Students will explore current issues in this area, including published literature, with an emphasis on learning the implementation of educational and learning strategy in organizations. Topics include return on investment in learning programs, selecting the optimal combination of curriculum, instruction, and technology, and evaluating the impact of learning programs on the strategic organizational performance.

ORG 8545 Advanced Seminar: Learning Initiatives & Organizational Change

3 Credits

This advanced course explores the role of learning, education and training in designing and implementing organizational change. The course examines the role of learning initiatives as tools for change and as environmental factors that impel organizations toward changing their strategies and tactics. Based on current theories and applications for leading organizational change, students will explore current literature and case examples of learning initiatives and educational programs to implement and support organizational change and organizational development.

ORG 8550 Organizational Systems Theory

3 Credits

ORG 8550 Organizational Systems Theory Based on current thinking in systems theory and its application, this course applies systems thinking to organizational development. Topics include system dynamics, system archetypes, dynamic links, loops, and the application of chaos theory to improving organizational performance.

ORG 8571 Contemporary Criminological Theory

3 Credits

This course involves a critical analysis of contemporary criminological theories and current applications or revisions of traditional theories. Students will explore topics ranging from restorative justice and gender-driven theories to critical criminology and environmental criminology. The relative benefits and drawbacks of each topic will be examined, as well as the status of current research relating to them.

ORG 8573 Types & Characteristics of Crime

3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to review the classification of different crime types, and to assess the distribution of each type across an array of socio-demographic variables, including class, race/ethnicity, gender, age, and locale. Students will learn about the various causes of the different types of crimes, and the specific ways the justice system should respond to different types of offenders.

ORG 8575 Advanced Analysis of Criminal Justice Processes

3 Credits

This course examines the processing of offenders through the criminal justice system, from arrest to corrections. Issues of due process will be analyzed and critiqued, with particular emphasis placed on judicial system parameters. Recognition of the need for the three components of the justice system to process cases efficiently will lead the student to an understanding of how systems theory is integrated into an overall analysis of the justice system.

ORG 8577 Juvenile Justice

3 Credits

This course focuses on the juvenile justice system, while highlighting differences between the juvenile and the adult criminal justice system. The course will not only cover traditional topics such as juvenile delinquency and the processing of juvenile offenders, but also current concerns about juvenile behavior, such as rates of youth violence and gang participation. The legal and philosophical bases for the separate system for juveniles will also be analyzed and debated.

ORG 8580 Mental Health & Crime

3 Credits

The relationship between crime, mental health, and mental illness are covered in this course, with a focus on analyzing specific treatment and rehabilitation practices used with various types of offenders in diverse settings. Emphasis will be placed on changes in the mental health system that generated an increase in the presence of mentally ill offenders in the criminal justice system. Additionally, focus will be placed on issues such as the accurate assessment of mental illness, problems with certain therapy methods, and difficulties in treating dangerous offenders, drawbacks of utilizing personnel with limited training, and other impediments and limitations to effective treatment of offenders.

ORG 8582 Drugs, Addiction, & Crime

3 Credits

This course explores the relationships among criminality, drug use, and addiction by examining the evolution of drug policies from the following perspectives: enforcement, prosecution, and sentencing of drug users and addicts. The impact of drug laws on criminal justice processing will also be examined. Students will gain an understanding of drug use and will explore theoretical orientations that help to explain why people use drugs and how such use leads to criminal behavior. Further, the ways in which drug use and drug policies have an impact on the juvenile justice and criminal justice systems will be covered. An integral part of this course will be based on current events, policies on drug treatment, and enforcement of drug laws.

ORG 8586 Evaluating Criminal Justice Interventions

3 Credits

This course focuses on methods used to examine the effectiveness of programs developed to treat offenders, support victims, as well those concerning crime prevention schemes. Prior evaluation models will be reviewed and problems and appropriate methods in assessing effective models of intervention will be discussed. Evaluation concerns will not only include program effectiveness, but also issues of ethics and legal requirements. Students will become familiar with how to address the need to design and evaluate programs according to such concerns. They will also have an opportunity to use prediction techniques and operational research methods to measure the effectiveness and performance of criminal justice programs.

ORG 8615 Advanced Topics in Organizational Development & Leadership

3 Credits

This highly experiential course explores current issues and practices in the application of leadership and organizational development processes and systems. Topics include succession planning, facilitation skills, leading across global cultures, strategic planning, transforming organizational cultures, implementing effective leadership development programs, and other current topics. Learning methodology include simulated organizational environments and the development of realistic strategic plans, systems, and processes that address the issues that impact the performance of organizations viewed as a whole.

ORG 8619 Current & Global Issues in Industrial & Organizational Psychology

3 Credits

Due to the rapidly and continually changing nature of industrial and organizational (I/O) psychology, it is important for scholars, researchers, and practitioners to stay abreast of current and emerging issues in the field. Given that many of the changes occurring in the field of I/O are due to the globalization of the business would, particular emphasis will be focused on the role and practice of I/O in the complex environment of global organizations. In this advanced seminar, students explore current and global issues that attract the attention of researchers and practitioners in I/O psychology, as evidenced by the published literature, with an emphasis on learning the application and implementation of best practices and emerging theories in the field. Topics in the seminar will evolve along with the issues that appear most often in the I/O literature, issues that receive the most attention in the professional and business press, and current lines of research having the most impact on the field.

ORG 8630 Influencing Leaders to Resolve Conflict

3 Credits

This course explores the theories and methods leaders can use to influence and persuade others to employ as constructive approaches to conflict resolution. Topics include the power leaders can employ to provide impetus to conflict resolution and effective communication strategies for leaders to employ in resolving conflict.

ORG 8632 Evaluating Conflict Resolution Processes

3 Credits

This course explores principles, challenges, and models of conflict resolution. The course emphasizes using organizational business metrics as key macro-level outcomes measures, and multiple-method, multiple source measurement approaches to predicting and explaining outcomes.

ORG 8635 Developing Conflict Resolution Plans & Policies

3 Credits

This course will lead the student through the development of a conflict resolution plan, and will focus on how a written plan serves as a key tool in conflict resolution for mediators, managers, and negotiators alike. Further emphasis will be given to the role communication plays the resolution process by providing a concrete structure, guidelines, and standards for conflict resolution.

ORG 8650 Strategies & Policies to Advance Mental Health Care

3 Credits

Analyze and transform mental health treatment systems, cross cultural mental health systems, advocate for legislative change, integrate research into coherent and effective argument to analyze and transform mental health treatment systems.

ORG 8801 Organization Design for Innovation

3 Credits

This course focuses on developing an organization design that encourages innovation and enhances the success of entrepreneurial ventures. Various organization design techniques are discussed as a foundation, followed by application to various scenarios and business issues.

ORG 8803 Creating a Culture of Innovation

3 Credits

This course focuses on the development of an organizational culture that encourages innovation and entrepreneurship. Principles of organizational culture are discussed as a foundation, as well as factors that increase innovation and entrepreneurship. Levers for driving culture and techniques of culture change will also be demonstrated. Students will develop an idea and business plan for an innovative venture within a corporation/agency or a new entrepreneurial venture. Students will demonstrate application of the program content in the creation of a business plan.

ORG 8805 Managing for Agility

3 Credits

Students in this course will learn the principles of managing for creativity and agility. This will include the role of management in encouraging and inhibiting creativity, as well as specific management techniques for managing staff in creative jobs. Specific management techniques will be compared and contrasted for their potential application to innovation and entrepreneurship. This seminar-based course will focus on the ability of organizations to rapidly respond to changing market conditions and emerging opportunities. Topics such as disruptive innovation, alternative organization models, the extended enterprise, and others will be discussed, with a focus on the latest thinking in this area.

ORG 8815 Global Issues in Innovation & Entrepreneurship

3 Credits

This course will focus on the emerging practice of innovation and entrepreneurship around the globe, with a particular focus on developing and lesser-developed countries. As countries such as India and China emerge as sources of innovation and entrepreneurship, it presents new challenges for countries that have traditionally held positions of economic leadership – how can innovators and entrepreneurs capitalize on this trend and counter these threats? Innovation and micro-enterprise in lesser-developed countries and the opportunities that it presents will also be discussed.

ORG 8855 Advanced Social Networking for Organizations

3 Credits

The role that media forms like “social media” (or computer-mediated social networking sites like Facebook or LinkedIn) play in large companies and organizations has become increasingly important for the analysis and leadership of organizations. In this course, students will develop a theoretical basis in, and begin to differentiate among, emerging media and internet technologies, the ethical questions surrounding social media, personal identity and the workplace, and the role that the internet, blogs and email have on group decision-making and the effectiveness of leaders. Students will take their knowledge of how social media are used for promotion and public relations, and how content communities and virtual social worlds are utilized in organizations, and apply it to creating plans for transforming organizations.

PED Physical Education and Health

PED 212 Foundation of Movement & Motor Activities

3 Credits

Students will examine integrated movement curriculum and the relationship between knowledge, motor skills, and movement activities. Activities will lead to understanding of how the body is used during fundamental motor skills and the progression to more advanced movement. Emphasis is on the study of human movement and the development of motor skills which enhance health related physical fitness. Movement concepts of body awareness, space, and quality of movement are defined. Fundamental movement skills are analyzed and used as a basis for planning physical education coursework.

PHI Philosophy

PHI 103 Informal Logic

3 Credits

This course is a study of correct and incorrect reasoning involved in everyday activities. The fundamentals of language and argument, deductive and inductive reasoning and other aspects of practical reasoning are examined. 

PHI 208 Ethics & Moral Reasoning

3 Credits

This course examines and evaluates theories and arguments concerning ethics and moral reasoning from a philosophical perspective. By engaging with historical and contemporary sources, students will analyze theories about the meaning, nature, and justification of ethical concepts; determine and assess how different forms of moral reasoning apply to contemporary moral issues; become more reflective and informed about their own moral beliefs; and develop their capacity for critical practical reasoning.

PHI 445 Personal & Organizational Ethics

3 Credits

In this course, students will examine various ethical theories, economic concepts, and business paradigms. These examinations will serve as the foundation for the analysis of moral problems in business. Students will explore the ethical challenges and dilemmas facing decision makers in business organizations. Students will also consider their own stake in the market as consumers, employees, managers, or small business owners. 

POL Political Science

POL 111 Introduction to Political Science

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the complexity and nuance of Political Science. It explores the political and social dynamics of choice, action, and consequence that underlie and support all political phenomena. Specifically, this course focuses on the why and how of politics rather than the what, in order to provide students with useful, current, and relevant conceptual and theoretical tools for enhancing their critical thinking skills.

POL 201 American National Government

3 Credits

A survey of government at the national level. Emphasis is placed on the constitutional basis of American government, federalism, the sources and forms of political behavior, the operation of the three branches of government, and the making of national policy.

POL 211 Introduction to Politics

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to selected institutions, processes, and political behaviors associated with the study of politics in the United States and globally.

POL 255 Introduction to International Relations

3 Credits

This course in International Relations is an introductory study of the interactions and interconnectivity of the countries of the world. The course emphasizes the need to think critically about international politics and foreign policy. Consequently, this course focuses topically on how and why wars begin, balances of power between states, international institutions, collective security, international communications, human rights, globalization, regime types, international trade, environmental change, imperialism, injustice, inequality, and other issues relevant to the changing world.

POL 303 The American Constitution

3 Credits

This course is a study of the Constitution of the United States and its role in American history and government. The study covers the drafting and ratification of the Constitution, its subsequent amendment and interpretation, and its contemporary role in American politics and government.

POL 310 Environmental Policies

3 Credits

Examines political, social, and economic policies and their impact on the global environment. Also explores ways in which policy decisions can serve to protect the environment.

POL 319 State & Local Government

3 Credits

This course examines the structure and processes of state and local governments and their related current problems and issues. There is a focus on the effect of Federalism and its effect on States.

POL 325 Congress & the Presidency

3 Credits

This course examines the notion of shared governance as it applies to two central institutions of the American national government, Congress and the Presidency. Students have an opportunity to learn more about the history, structure, and functions of each institution but there is much emphasis placed on the relationship between Congress and the Presidency. Topics include leadership, policymaking, tensions within each institution and between the different institutions, and a focus on a variety of public policy areas.

POL 353 Comparative Politics

3 Credits

This course introduces the basic concepts and theories of comparative politics through an analysis of selected political systems and governments from various regions and societies across the world. Topical analysis in the course includes an emphasis on key political institutions, political culture, ideology, globalization, conflict and stability, various state and non-state actors, and on issues associated with economic development and underdevelopment.

POL 355 International Relations

3 Credits

The course in international relations is the study of relations between different nations of the world with an emphasis on understanding the political implications of international security matters and the international political economy. The topical emphasis on nationalism, diplomacy, conflict, international organizations and actors, human rights, political economy, and key global issues offers insights into the principles of identity, cooperation, and the use of power in an international context.

POL 411 Political Behavior

3 Credits

Students will study political behavior as it relates to campaigns and elections in the United States.
Selected course themes include political communication, participation, voting, and elections.

POL 470 Introduction to Political Analysis

3 Credits

This course introduces the preliminary processes needed to research and write presentable and professional Political Science papers. Practical, hands-on experience and in-class exercises will walk students through the research process and enable them to create expert research products. Specifically, this course focuses on how to choose a research topic, conduct a thorough literature review, make critical research design decisions, collect and analyze relevant data, and skillfully document and present the results of the research. Prerequisite: 18 credit hours in Political Science.

POL 480 Methodology in Political Science

3 Credits

This course completes the process of learning how to conduct political analysis and critically assess statistical research. In this course, students will learn how to measure political science events and actions, identify and assess pertinent variables, design valid hypothesis testing techniques, control for alternative hypotheses, and interpret data in various formats, including graphs, statistical tables, and charts. Students will utilize pragmatic, relevant Political Science-related exercises to enhance and refine their political science analysis skills. Prerequisite: POL 470.

POL 497 Political Science Capstone

3 Credits

In this final course, students will demonstrate mastery of program outcomes in Political Science and Government by applying the scientific method and research analysis to create a professional research paper examining a current and relevant political issue. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course.

PPA Public Administration

PPA 301 Principles of Public Administration

3 Credits

An introductory examination of the characteristics of the public organization and its impact on society including analysis of the principles of public administration, personnel issues, budgetary activities, legal dynamics, as well as historical development of the field are included.

PPA 303 Finance for Public Administrators

3 Credits

This course addresses the principles of state and local financing of government, sources of public revenue, objects of public expenditures, problems of fiscal administration, emerging policy issues involving land use and taxation, spending and budgeting, intergovernmental cooperation, debt financing, financing for economic development, and privatization. Prerequisite: ECO 203.

PPA 305 Budgeting for Public Administrators

3 Credits

This is an introductory course in government budgeting dealing with public revenue, expenditure policies, and politics of the budgetary process while addressing current issues and challenges in this field.

PPA 307 Intergovernmental Relations & Issues

3 Credits

The theory and practice of intergovernmental relations and the various issues that accompany the daily operations and affect the overall efficiency of our system. This course will address both the legal and political perspectives of the interactions, relationships and public policy considerations throughout the various components and levels of government. Prerequisite: PPA 301.

PPA 401 Urban Management

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to formal and informal elements of urban management systems addressing the exploration of alternative approaches to dealing with problems arising from rapid urban growth. Prerequisite: PPA 301.

PPA 403 Administrative Law

3 Credits

A study of the nature and the law of the administrative procedure, of separation and delegation of powers, and of the scope of judicial review and other remedies against administrative actions.

PPA 405 Personnel Management

3 Credits

An examination of the essential processes, policies, and laws pertaining to public personnel including an analysis of issues concerning public personnel administrators, employee protection, motivation, and effectiveness.

PPA 497 Public Policy Formation

3 Credits

A study of how the dynamics of governmental decision making influence the content of public policy; course focuses upon how legislators, interest groups, chief executives, and the bureaucracy function to define alternatives and to shape policy agenda and content. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

PPA 601 Foundations of Public Administration

3 Credits

This course examines the theory and practice of public administration, its legal and constitutional foundation and the role of the public administrator in public policy. The context of the course discussions are based on the current issues facing public agency administrators.

PPA 602 Public Financial Management

3 Credits

This course is an exploration of current governmental fiscal management techniques and issues. Other course topics include various types of financial and technical assistance as well as quasi-governmental and non-profit management organizations.

PPA 603 Government Budgeting

3 Credits

This is a comprehensive, straightforward examination of government budgeting. Topics include the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to revenue projection, the collection and review of departmental proposals, the development of capital budgeting policy and other budgeting tasks. Also addressed are budget implementation, accounting and financial reporting. A variety of methods for maintaining budgetary balance, preventing overspending and dealing with contingencies are presented and discussed.

PPA 604 Urban Planning/Redevelopment

3 Credits

This course focuses upon the visioning and modeling of services and programs, both anticipatory and responsive, utilizing market-driven information. Students integrate theories from economics, information management, finance and leadership, culminating in the generation of a comprehensive business plan.

PPA 605 Negotiation, Bargaining & Conflict Management

3 Credits

This course analyzes bargaining and negotiation principles and practices in the public sector. The course focuses on the financial issues of contract negotiations and labor relations and building negotiation skills of the administrator.

PPA 699 Public Policy Development

3 Credits


This course is an examination of influences affecting policy development and decision-making in the urban political arena. It also covers policy management, policy execution, establishing and measuring criteria for policy success, and effective communication throughout the public policy process. This course is cumulative in nature, integrating knowledge and information attained while completing the entire MPA curriculum. In addition, this course requires the generation and presentation of an analysis of a community development project.

PRM Project Management

PRM 300 Introduction to Project Management

3 Credits

This course provides the foundational principles and techniques to initiate, plan, execute, control, and close projects. Topics such as the project life-cycle management, project organizations and leadership, project team building will be covered. Project management methods and techniques for project charter, scope, schedule, budget, risk management, control and closeout, and project management software are also covered.

PSY Psychology

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology

3 Credits

This course is a survey of selected topics in psychology, including research methods, physiological psychology, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning, memory, motivation, gender roles, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and social psychology.

PSY 104 Child & Adolescent Development

3 Credits
This course provides a basic introduction to the nature of human growth and development from conception through adolescence. Students are provided the opportunity to explore the physical, psychosocial, and cognitive factors of growth and development from both a theoretical and a practical perspective. The context and impact of the family and society as well as individual, cultural, moral, and linguistic differences on development will be covered.

PSY 202 Adult Development & Life Assessment

3 Credits

This course presents adult development theory and links theoretical concepts of life and learning through a process of psychometric assessment and reflection. Both classical and contemporary adult development theories are examined. These theories then provide the paradigm for self-analysis and life learning, including a plan for personal, professional and academic learning.

PSY 203 Psychology of Human Sexuality

3 Credits

This course examines various perspectives on sexuality, such as its biological, psychological, social, and cultural dimensions. Topics examined include but are not limited to: male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology of sexual responding; sexual development, behavior, and identity over the life span; and variations in typical and atypical sexual behavior and expression. Emphasis is placed on the human sexual experience as a vehicle for self-awareness, self-understanding, and self-acceptance.

PSY 301 Social Psychology

3 Credits

Students explore how the thoughts, feelings and behavior of individuals are influenced by other human beings in a variety of social situations. This course also entails a survey and critical analysis of the various methods used by researchers in social psychology. Topics include: social cognition, aggression, prejudice, interpersonal attraction, altruistic behavior, conformity, group influences, and conflict resolution. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SSC 101 or equivalent.

PSY 302 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

3 Credits

This course examines the influence of an organization upon the individual, as well as ways an individual can influence an organization. Topics include recruiting, personnel selection, organizational climate, group problem solving, and conflict resolution.

PSY 303 Abnormal Psychology

3 Credits

The course entails a study of the diagnosis, causes, treatment, and prevention of psychological disorders. Problems with the reliability and validity of the American Psychiatric Association system for diagnosing psychological disorders will be discussed, and various alternative systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent and PSY 330.

PSY 304 Lifespan Development

3 Credits

This course consists of the application of the methods and principles of several fields of psychology to an extensive study of human growth development in the child, adolescent, and adult. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

PSY 307 The Journey of Adulthood

3 Credits

This course presents process-oriented, multi-disciplinary views, principles, research findings, and perspectives across the adulthood continuum: early adulthood, middle adulthood, and late adulthood. Students gain an understanding of developmental changes occurring in the realms of biology, anatomy, and social and cultural contexts in which aging occurs.

PSY 317 Cognitive Functioning in the Elderly

3 Credits

This course will introduce changes both cognitively and physically, that occur in both healthy and pathological aging. This course will emphasize changes in functioning, learning, language-processing, decision-making, memory, and reasoning in older adults Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent.

PSY 323 Perception, Learning, & Cognition

3 Credits

Students will study research and theory about mental processes that go between experience and the human mind. Students will gather and interpret data for several simple experiments that demonstrate classic research findings in perception, learning, and cognition. Perception entails the mental processes involved in the organization and interpretation of sensory experience. Learning entails relatively permanent changes in behavior that result from experience. Cognition explains how the mind processes information, how we encode, store, and retrieve memories, and how we use information to form beliefs, make decisions, and solve problems. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent.

PSY 325 Statistics for the Behavioral & Social Sciences

3 Credits

Descriptive and inferential statistics are investigated and multiple techniques for statistical analysis are introduced in this course. Formulas for presenting and evaluating data are explored in accordance with generally accepted protocol for statistical analysis. Prerequisite: MAT 232.

PSY 326 Research Methods

3 Credits

Research Methods is an introduction to the foundations of research methodology, design and analysis. Basic principles of qualitative and quantitative research are explored and evaluated. Understanding the results of statistical analysis as it applies to research is a focus of this curriculum. Prerequisite: MAT 232.

PSY 330 Theories of Personality

3 Credits

This course reviews the basic concepts and principles of the major theories of personality. It also assesses the scientific worth and validity of these theories as they relate to the development of personality. Theoretical assumptions of the importance of environment and genetics will be stressed. Students will be challenged to identify the theoretical concepts that they think best describe personality development and to evaluate their own personality, as it relates to the theories being presented. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent.

PSY 331 Psychology of Learning

3 Credits

Learning is the relatively permanent change in behavior and mental processes resulting from experience. This course consists of the application of learning theory and research in a wide range of settings where learning takes place. 

PSY 344 Issues & Trends in Adult Development

3 Credits

This course provides an interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary issues and trends in adult development as well as emerging research areas. Topics include intergenerational conflicts, changing role dynamics, volunteerism, self-esteem in adulthood, resilience and vulnerability, maintaining and enhancing cognitive vitality in adulthood, adult employment trends including multiple career changes, coping with “boomerang children,” grandparents raising grandchildren, and the growth of lifelong learning.

PSY 350 Physiological Psychology

3 Credits

Students study the anatomy and physiology of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nervous system, and endocrine system. Study of the biological systems promotes better understanding of mind-body relationships important to hunger, thirst, sex, sleep, emotion, learning, and memory. Students also examine medical theories, assessment, and treatments of psychological disorders including new imaging technologies and drug therapy. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or equivalent.

PSY 352 Cognitive Psychology

3 Credits

Cognitive psychology takes a scientific approach to understanding the fundamental mental processes involved in everyday cognition. This course covers the topics of perception, attention, memory, and language by examining both classic and contemporary cognitive psychology methods and experimental results. Prerequisite: PSY 101

PSY 361 Health Psychology

3 Credits

Students explore the mind/body relationship as it pertains to health, stress, and the person’s response to medical treatment. This course includes a review of anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, the endocrine system, the immune system, and other organ systems. Students explore new strategies of applied psychology for sustaining health, managing stress, and recovering successfully from disease, injury, and medical treatment.

PSY 380 Counseling & Behavior Change

3 Credits

This course is designed for students entering into human service fields. Students compare and contrast behavior change theories and models, determine client needs, apply motivational strategies and counseling skills, and evaluate moral and ethical issues. Cultural competency and cultural sensitivity concepts are also discussed. Prerequisites: HWE 200 and PSY 361.

PSY 495 Adult Development Capstone

3 Credits

This course is a synthesis of the major ideas, perspectives, and concepts gained from the study of adult development A substantive paper is developed which requires students to critically analyze their experiences and integrate knowledge gained throughout the program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course.

PSY 496 Applied Project

3 Credits

This course provides a synthesis of the major ideas, perspectives, theories, and concepts gained from the study of psychology. A substantive simulated research project is created, providing students the opportunity to integrate key learning and knowledge gained from throughout the degree program. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course and the majority of the major coursework.

PSY 600 Introduction to Graduate Study in Psychology

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to graduate study at Ashford University in the field of psychology. Students will explore psychology as a science and profession. They will examine professional roles and organizations, ethics and professional standards, theoretical perspectives, and contemporary practical applications of psychology to real-world situations.

PSY 605 Developmental Psychology

3 Credits

This course will cover developmental and contextual experiences of humans across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on issues and questions that have dominated the field over time and continue to provide impetus for research. Interactions will focus on articles that describe and illustrate current theories and trends. Students will read selected research articles and self-select additional readings related to weekly topics and personal interest. These topics include theoretical trends and foundations in research, policy and ethics, health and wellness, human developmental context, and end-of-life issues.

PSY 610 Applied Social Psychology

3 Credits

This course provides a comprehensive examination of the science of social psychology as well as how it is applied to manage and aid the understanding of contemporary social issues. Topics include social quandaries encountered in the fields of mental and physical health, the workplace, the education system, and the legal system. Students will study seminal theories and research that informs the practical application of social psychology to real-life situations. Students will also apply social psychology theory and research to explain current social issues.

PSY 615 Personality Theories

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the basic concepts and principles of the major theories of personality. Students will assess the scientific worth and validity of these theories based on case studies that show how these theories are applied to the treatment of psychological disorders and how personality assessments are applied in different settings. Detailed descriptions of healthy and unhealthy personality types will be stressed, and students will be challenged to evaluate various assessment tools as they relate to the respective theories being presented.

PSY 620 Learning & Cognition

3 Credits

This course introduces students to multiple dimensions of learning and cognition, which range from the basic processes underlying learning to the contexts that promote self-regulation and metacognition. As the foundation of cognitive psychology, learning and cognition encompasses many topics including attention, memory, categorization, problem solving, epistemology, language acquisition, and recognition of diversity. During the course, students will study a broad range of content through an eclectic collection of peer-reviewed articles focusing on the different aspects of learning and cognition. This course highlights main findings, established facts, and skills in learning and cognition that are applicable to a wide range of contexts.

PSY 625 Biological Bases of Behavior

3 Credits

In this course students will explore the detailed anatomy and physiology of the brain, including cellular physiology, synaptic transmission, and clinical neuroanatomy. Theories that focus on the relationship between brain function and behavior will be reviewed, and students will illustrate their understanding of important brain networks, including those involved in sensation/perception, language, memory, movement, and emotions. Through a review of the history of behavioral neuroscience, students will learn about the relationship between symptom presentation and underlying theories of neuroanatomy/neurophysiology as well as how these concepts have evolved over time. Students will also become familiar with important research methods used in neuroscience by analyzing current concepts in brain aging and neurodegenerative diseases. For the final assignment in the course, students will design a grant proposal that focuses on a particular disorder/syndrome in the area of neurophysiology. Prerequisites: PSY 600, PSY 605, PSY 610, PSY 615 and PSY 620.

PSY 630 Psychopharmacology

3 Credits

Students will examine the activity of drugs, both therapeutic and recreational, on the body with an emphasis on the brain. Theories of the biological basis of psychiatric disorders will be explored as a basis for examining the professional standards behind therapeutic drug use. The history of drug use, research methods and ethical concerns will be examined. Prerequisite: PSY 625.

PSY 635 Research Design & Methods

3 Credits

This course reviews the basic concepts of common quantitative research methods and introduces research design using qualitative and mixed methods. In the review of quantitative methods, emphasis will be placed on experimental research designs. Students will be challenged to select appropriate research designs and methodologies for various research questions. The course will culminate in a detailed research proposal on topics chosen by the students.

PSY 640 Psychological Testing & Assessment

3 Credits

The course includes an overview of individual and group approaches to testing in psychology. Students will review psychological assessments utilized to evaluate personality, intelligence, achievement, and career-related interests and skills in a variety of work settings. The course will provide students with opportunities to analyze psychometric methodologies typically employed in the development and validation of psychological and educational tests. Students will apply knowledge of psychological measurement principles to testing and assessment data with an emphasis on ethical and professional interpretation. Issues and challenges related to testing and assessment with diverse populations will be integrated into the course. Prerequisite: PSY 635.

PSY 645 Psychopathology

3 Credits

This course introduces students to objective and phenomenological understandings of psychological symptoms and disorders. Students will draw from various theoretical and historical perspectives to build their understanding of diagnostic and treatment methods for psychological disorders and develop their appreciation for evidence-based practices. Additionally, students will be encouraged to conceptualize psychopathology from a socioculturally sensitive standpoint through the examination of culture-related syndromes. Diagnostic manuals and handbooks will be discussed and used throughout the course. 

PSY 650 Introduction to Clinical & Counseling Psychology

3 Credits

This course examines similarities and differences in clinical and counseling psychology, with an emphasis on professional roles and activities. Students will gain greater awareness of their attitudes toward various ethical and professional issues, psychotherapy modalities, theoretical orientations, and clinical interventions through case studies. Evidenced-based practices and psychotherapy integration will also be covered during the course.

PSY 699 Master of Arts in Psychology Capstone

3 Credits

The capstone course is the culminating educational experience for the Master of Arts in Psychology. In this course, students will integrate and apply what they have learned throughout the program to meet competencies as outlined in the program learning outcomes. Students will be exposed to a holistic view of psychology as a discipline, and they will be encouraged to think critically about the broader themes that link various subfields of psychology. Students will reflect on the experience of the program as a whole and will consider how the program’s themes apply to a variety of civic and professional settings. The capstone affords students a final opportunity to practice and demonstrate the skills they will need to succeed after graduation.

PSY 5130 Life Span Development

3 Credits

This course surveys the major theoretical perspectives on life span development from conception through late adulthood. Developmental processes related to physical, cognitive, moral, and emotional functions are reviewed as well as societal and cultural aspects of development.

PSY 5420 Principles of Social Psychology

3 Credits

This course provides an introduction and overview of the principles and theories of social psychology. The course includes exploration of behavior in groups, group impacts on individual behavior and the ways in which organizational rules and norms impact behavior. Constructs of social psychology, including social influence, social thinking, and attitude formation are covered and related to sociological and psychological research.

PSY 6160 Family Systems & Dynamics

3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the systems approach to intervention with families. It includes a historical perspective on family theory development. The focus is on obtaining knowledge and theory about the nuclear family in traditional and alternative forms. Normal family patterns of interaction, family life cycle, family of origin, family subsystems, and societal influence are explored. Contemporary issues and outcome research literature are reviewed. This course serves as a knowledge base for further study of assessment, treatment, and intervention with families.

PSY 7210 Adult Psychopathology & Treatment I

3 Credits

This course focuses on the etiology and diagnosis of adult psychopathological disorders. Students develop skills in case conceptualization and addressing adult disorders, and differential diagnosis and construction of a systematic treatment plan, emerging treatment revision, assessment of outcome, termination, and ethical issues in the treatment process. While placing treatment within a theoretical context, the real emphasis in this course is on treatment techniques aimed at symptom and problem reduction. Benefits and limitations of the diagnostic process are reviewed.

PSY 7301 Advanced Performance Enhancement I: Core Mind-Body Practices

3 Credits

This course presents mind-body practices that provide the core elements of behaviors for individual and team performance. The student will learn to practice and to teach mastery of cognitive and physical skills to control systemic arousal and focusing behavior. The course will provide tools to construct performance profiles on individuals taking into account age, gender and cultural parameters. This depth of analysis provides the foundation to effectively integrate mind-body practices with performance enhancement. The student will be given strategies for measuring the efficacy of applying mind-body practices in diverse settings.

PSY 7305 Advanced Psychomotor Development & Kinesiology

3 Credits

This course explores the practical applications of physiological and psychomotor dimensions of performance. The curriculum provides a comprehensive analysis of human movement and mental training applications. Parameters for measuring the stress response will be explored in conjunction with optimizing human performance. The lifelong developmental aspects of physiological and motor behavior will be examined.

PSY 7311 Advanced Performance Enhancement II: Integrative Mind-Body Practices

3 Credits

This course provides in depth study of advanced research and theories that integrate mind-body practices in enhancing performance. Students are taught how to utilize multiple conceptual frameworks and research findings in training skills such as advanced arousal control, imagery and focusing. The student will be able to assess the influence of age, gender and cultural factors on performance and apply this understanding to developing individualized training protocols. The graduate will be able to assess the efficacy of integrative mind-body practice models in enhancing individual, group and team performance.

PSY 7314 Rehabilitation in Sports & Performance

3 Credits

This course examines crucial rehabilitation topics in sports and performance. The curriculum provides methods of psychological evaluation and treatment for injuries, addictions, eating disorders, and burnout. Students will investigate the dynamics of aggression in sports and performance settings. Retirement issues and exercise adherence strategies are explored. Inclusive in the course is a special debate section challenging students to confront current ethical issues in the field.

PSY 7317 Advanced Group Dynamics in Sports & Performance Settings

3 Credits

This course examines the integral relationship between leadership, communication, and group performance. The curriculum applies group and team principles to diverse populations such as youth, special needs, high-profile performers and support networks. Leadership is studied within the context of group functioning. Students will develop research protocols for assessing group and team functioning.

PSY 7321 Advanced Performance Enhancement III: The Psychology of Peak Experience

3 Credits

This course is the pinnacle of performance enhancement teachings. The emphasis in this course is the development of advanced awareness skills in the attainment of self-mastery. The student learns how to guide individual goal achievement in congruence with current skills. The ultimate goal for the student is to recognize and cultivate individual and group experiences that are characterized by such terms as optimal performance, actualization, effortless awareness, flow, and peak experience.

PSY 7330 Sports & Performance Psychology as a Business

3 Credits

This course assists students in developing personal business plans. The curriculum addresses the financial, legal and ethical issues encountered in sports and performance psychology. The course gives the student persuasive arguments to use with clients to prevent their use of licit and illicit drugs and performance enhancing substances, as well as advising clients who have already used illicit substances and how to handle accusations against them for substance use or abuse. Potential career opportunities are identified and compared. The student will prepare a personal resume, market analysis and comprehensive business plan.

PSY 7510 Biological Bases of Behavior

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with a foundation of human physiology including the nervous, hormonal, reproductive, and sensory systems, and the attendant functions of digestion, sleep, learning and memory, emotion, and other human biological functions. The course provides an essential knowledge base for most other offerings in the field of psychology.

PSY 7512 Psychology of Leadership

3 Credits

The course will provide an overview of the key events and accomplishments that have played an important role in the historical evolution of the psychology of leadership and the systems that form the basis of the discipline. A review of the history of organizational psychology introduces several important distinctions that define the discipline, and theoretical models and perspectives that trace the evolution of theory and practice. The learning activities emphasize the dichotomy between the science and applications of organizational psychology and leadership. The course approaches the psychology of leadership from three different perspectives 1) objectives for research and practice in the field, 2) basic methodological orientation of practitioners and 3) the systems and research-based foundations that form the basis of organizational psychology and the psychology of leadership.

RES Real Estate Studies

RES 301 Principles of Real Estate

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the general principles of real estate, to include industry terminology, ethics, deeds, listing and purchase agreements, agency, contracts, and property valuation decisions. Emphasis will also be on factors impacting local and national real estate markets. 

RES 325 Real Estate Practice

3 Credits

This course examines the basic job functions of real estate salespersons and brokers. Property listing, advertising, escrow, sales, and establishing a client base will be covered with practical applications for completing successful transactions. 

RES 327 Real Estate Economics

3 Credits

This course is a study of the foundational economic principles of real estate with an overview of the U.S. capitalist system. Focus will be on land use, markets, cycles and growth patterns, as well as property and income taxation. 

RES 334 Real Estate Finance

3 Credits

This course primarily examines the residential real estate finance markets and their impacts on consumers, but will also cover facets of commercial real estate. Mortgage options and purchase costs will be highlighted with attention to theories of real estate investment. 

RES 345 Legal Aspects of Real Estate

3 Credits

This course is a study of the legal system and its impact on purchase, ownership, sale, and leasing of real estate. Topics to be covered include contracts, wills, zoning, and environmental law, as well as Constitutional issues in real estate. 

RES 429 Property Management

3 Credits

This course provides the framework for the management and development of inventory of private and commercial real estate properties on a large scale. Included emphases are the roles of the property manager, landlord duties and policies, leases, maintenance, reports, and insurance. 

RES 431 Commercial Real Estate Investment

3 Credits

This course examines investment transactions, asset management, and enterprise management as the core components of commercial real estate investment. Methods for determining the value of commercial properties and the sources of real estate capital are also discussed. 

RES 450 Real Estate Appraisal

3 Credits

A study of the functions and approaches to appraisal, which include cost, income, and the direct sale comparison approach. The social and economic factors that impact determination of value will be discussed with emphasis on analyzing market data. 

RES 497 Strategic Management of the Real Estate Enterprise

3 Credits

This capstone course discusses the managerial decision-making and problem-solving processes that determine the failure or success of a real estate enterprise. Strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation and control are key points of comprehensive focus. The course also incorporates program comprehensive demonstrations of knowledge. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

RES Research

RES 5240 Applied Research Methods

3 Credits

This course involves the study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. Students will be introduced to social scientific inquiry and the research design process, as well as some of the most common quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Through the process of critiquing research articles, students will learn how to determine the appropriate use of research design, recognize errors and biases in conducting research, and communicate the methods and results of particular studies.

RES 5400 Understanding, Interpreting & Applying Statistical Concepts

3 Credits

This course teaches students how to critically analyze, interpret, and apply statistical concepts to research in education and the social sciences. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include sampling, frequency distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, and probability. Statistical analyses covered include correlation, regression, t-tests, nonparametric tests, and Analysis of Variance. Basic research design issues are also addressed focusing on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and to apply the concepts covered to various psychological problems and realistic situations. Emphasis is on developing skills in interpreting statistical results presented in research articles.

RES 7105 Scholarly Argument I

3 Credits

In this course students will learn foundation skills for searching the academic literature and constructing a sound argument. Students will develop a detailed topic outline and an annotated bibliography of resources in an area of interest. This course will give students the opportunity to develop the research skills to succeed in their coursework and complete either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

RES 7110 Scholarly Argument II

3 Credits

This course will build on the work students began in Scholarly Argument I and the research skills honed throughout the curriculum. Organization of content and formulating a well-researched scholarly argument are key learning outcomes. Students will produce a first draft of a literature review in their content areas and review potential research methodologies for completing either an Applied Doctoral Project or Dissertation.

RES 7302 Advanced Research Methods

3 Credits

This course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative and qualitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. The course is divided into three sections, which cover social scientific inquiry and research design, quantitative methodologies, and qualitative methodologies. Qualitative methods will be emphasized, but a foundation for quantitative methodological principles will be provided. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research.

RES 7400 Research Design & Methods – Quantitative

3 Credits
This course involves the advanced study of research design, and the quantitative methods that can be used in addressing research questions. Students will gain experience developing their own research ideas and learning how to select and apply appropriate research designs to test those ideas. Through the process of critiquing research articles, students will also learn how to evaluate which research designs would be appropriate to test various areas of inquire, as well as how to communicate the methods and results of particular quantitative studies. Students will be required to complete a training on ethics in research, as well as complete a quantitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research.

RES 7402 Advanced Tests & Measurements

3 Credits

This course involves the advanced study of the theory and practice of psychological measurement. Students review and apply the concepts of measurement (levels of measurement, variables, and validity and reliability of instruments and measurement procedures), and basic principles of statistics (descriptive statistics, univariate inferential statistics for comparisons of sample means, correlation, and regression), as a basis for exploring the proper use of tests and measurements in psychological research. Students will explore published research based on psychometric instruments and other measurement methodologies, and design a quantitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research.

RES 7410 Research Design & Methods - Qualitative

3 Credits

This course involves the advanced study of research design, in general, and the qualitative inquiry, in particular, that can be used in addressing research questions. The epistemological assumptions underlying the qualitative methodology will be explored as students become familiar with the philosophical issues underlying how we know what we know. The ability to choose a researchable topic and create associated research questions will be emphasized. Students will become familiar with a variety of approaches including ethnography, grounded theory, phenomenology, narrative, participatory action research, and case study. A variety of common data collection methods will be studied, such as observation, interviews, surveys, and historical document collection. Validation and reliability standards, as well as evaluation criteria for qualitative approaches will be addressed. Students will be required to complete training on ethics in research, as well as complete a qualitative research proposal in an area of interest, which may include dissertation related research.

RES 7415 Advanced Statistics

3 Credits

This course emphasizes inferential statistical concepts related to methods most appropriate to data and theories. The focus is on a quantitative approach to the concepts and methods of statistical inference. Topics include hypothesis testing, probability, multiple correlation and regression, t-tests, Analysis of Variance, Analysis of Covariance, and Multivariate Analysis of Variance, and nonparametric tests. Research design issues are addressed, with a focus on selecting data analysis techniques to appropriately address research questions and apply the concepts covered to various research problems and real life situations. Emphasis is on developing skills for interpreting statistical results presented in scholarly research articles.

RES 7430 Action Research

3 Credits

Action research is a reflective process of collaborative, participatory problem solving. This course addresses the processes and procedures for conducting action research, as well as how to develop an action research plan. Students will attain a conceptual and applied understanding of action research methods and the skills to use these methods to transform an organization through data driven decision-making. Students will be able to critically analyze and design action research projects, collect and analyze data, interpret results, and articulate action research principles as a leader in relevant contexts.

RES 7440 Advanced Study in Qualitative Research

3 Credits

Students with interest in qualitative research, or with a desire to utilize this methodology for their respective doctoral dissertation, will be given an opportunity to greatly expand their existing knowledge base on qualitative research methodology. Students may elect to begin working on a preliminary proposal for their doctoral dissertation (or select and explore a topic of interest that may become the dissertation topic) for the culminating project in this course.

RES 7480 Evidence-Based Practice

3 Credits

This course demonstrates the value of evidence-based practice as an integral part of formulating human services research and policy. Course work examines the current definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. The course provides an evaluation of evidence-based literature, including case study examples of the application of evidence-based practices in human services. The course also examines actions to further evidence-based policy, including preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence.

RES 8910 Dissertation Planning I

1 Credit

In this course, students begin drafting their dissertation under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on the description of their topic, refinement of their research questions, and outlining their review of the literature with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student's individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during, or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.

RES 8912 Dissertation Planning II

1 Credit

In this course students continue drafting their dissertation from Dissertation Planning I under instructor supervision. Students working individually on their dissertation drafts focus on further refinement of the description of their topic, the final draft wording of their research questions, and beginning to write their review of the literature and research methodology with feedback and recommendations for revisions from their instructor. Students will exchange research concepts and proposed approaches about their research methodology with other students proposing similar methods (qualitative, quantitative, mixed, action). Final approval of these drafts of portions of the dissertation rests with the student's individual dissertation committees, as described in the current University of the Rockies Dissertation Handbook, as revised from time to time. Following the procedures outlined in the Handbook, students may form their committees before, during or after their enrollment and completion of Dissertation Planning I and II.

RES 8920 Applied Doctoral Project Planning I

1 Credit

In this course students will begin drafting their Applied Doctoral Project under instructor supervision. Students will work individually on their Applied Doctoral Project drafts and their Project Justification drafts, focusing on the description of their project, refinement of their research questions, and a draft of their review of the literature. Students are encouraged to work closely with their chair during this course.

RES 8981 - 8985 Applied Doctoral Project

1 Credit

Students opting to complete an Applied Doctoral Project must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five terms of Applied Doctoral Project credit, one credit per term. Applied Doctoral Projects are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Applied Doctoral Project Handbook.

RES 8986 Applied Doctoral Project Extension

1 Credit

When an Applied Doctoral Project extends beyond 5 credit hours, students must register in Applied Doctoral Project Extension until the Applied Doctoral Project is complete.

RES 8987 Applied Doctoral Project Extension

1 Credit
When an Applied Doctoral Project extends beyond 5 credit hours, students must register in Applied Doctoral Project Extension until the Applied Doctoral Project is complete. Students are registered for RES 8987 after successfully passing the Preliminary Oral Defense, at which point the Applied Doctoral Project Support Fee is no longer charged. Equivalent to RES 8986.

RES 8990 Dissertation

1 Credit

Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five consecutive terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook.

RES 8991 Dissertation Extension

1 Credit

When Dissertation extends beyond 5 credit hours, students must register
in Dissertation Extension until the Dissertation is complete. Equivalent
to RES 8993.

RES 8992 Dissertation

1 Credit

Students writing a dissertation must complete a total of 5 credits by registering for five terms of dissertation credit, one credit per term. Dissertations are written per the policies, practices, and procedures in the Dissertation Handbook. Students are registered for RES 8992 after successfully passing the Preliminary Oral Defense, at which point the Dissertation Support Fee is no longer charged. Clinical program students register for dissertation after they complete PSY 7620, Professional Issues in Clinical Psychology. Equivalent to RES 8990.

RES 8993 Dissertation Extension

1 Credit

When Dissertation extends beyond 5 credit hours, students must register in Dissertation Extension until the Dissertation is complete. Students are registered for RES 8993 after successfully passing the Preliminary Oral Defense, at which point the Dissertation Support Fee is no longer charged. Equivalent to RES 8991.

SCI Science

SCI 207 Our Dependence upon the Environment

4 Credits

In this course, learners deepen their understanding of the importance of natural resources to mankind. Students explore physical, biological, and ecological principles, examine how human alterations affect the environment, and reflect on the controversies surrounding various approaches to addressing environmental problems and the steps some communities have taken to address these challenges.

SOC Sociology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

3 Credits

This introductory course presents basic concepts, theories, and research in sociology. Group organization, sex and gender, marriage and the family, sports as a social institution, and collective behavior are among the topics considered.

SOC 120 Introduction to Ethics & Social Responsibility

3 Credits

This course introduces the basic ethical concepts and explores philosophic perspectives for understanding the meaning of social responsibility. Topics include ethical theories, the role of government, the role of corporations, environmental issues, and ethical integrity.

SOC 203 Social Problems

3 Credits

Drugs, poverty, illiteracy, homelessness, AIDS, undocumented aliens, single-parent families, urban and farm crises, and racial and environmental issues are examined. Possible causes and remedies are scrutinized.

SOC 205 Social Theory

3 Credits

Social theory refers to efforts to understand and illuminate the nature of social life. As such, social theory is not only the domain of sociologists. Contributors to social theory include economists, philosophers, psychologists, historians, activists, dramatists, essayists, poets, and novelists. Moreover, ordinary folks like us also theorize about social life. Social theories are crucial for helping us as individuals make sense of our daily lives, and they are essential to understanding new research, social practices and institutions. With the long-term aim of helping us better understand our lives and the world we live in, we will study what sociological theorists, have to say about the social world. The course covers key theorists such as Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Bourdieu and Foucault, Du Bois, Butler and Bauman and their seminal works, as well as the key social thought movements of Capitalism, Modernity, Alternative Knowledge, Self and Society.

SOC 301 Identity & Social Inequality

3 Credits

The course considers issues of identity, social inequality, and discrimination in society. The focus is on identities such as race and ethnicity, sex and gender, social class, culture, age, and ability, as well as the intersection between them. The focus is on these social categories as both elements of personal identity and sources of social inequality.

SOC 304 Social Gerontology

3 Credits

The course focuses on social stereotypes and prejudice against the aged, discrimination, friends and family, care giving, living environments, demography, senior political power, legislation, elder abuse, and death and dying.

SOC 305 Crime & Society

3 Credits

The course considers the basic sociological theories and research findings concerning crime. The punishment and corrections process, organized crime, corporate crime, the police, the courts and the impact of crime on the victim are examined.

SOC 307 Gender & Sexuality

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to gender and sexuality studies from a sociological perspective. Its primary focus is critical perspectives on the social construction of gender and sexuality, inequalities on the basis of gender and sexuality, activism around issues of gender and sexuality, and how gender and sexuality shape and are shaped by other systems of inequality such as race, ethnicity, class, culture, and age. Also covered are key sociological discourses in the areas of feminism, masculinities, and queer theory.

SOC 308 Racial & Ethnic Groups

3 Credits

The course considers major racial and ethnic groups, especially African Americans, Asian Americans, ethnic Whites, Hispanics, and Native Americans. The focus is on the traits of each group and its pattern of adaptation to the larger society.

SOC 312 Child, Family & Society

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the child (infant through elementary) and the reciprocal relationships children develop with their family, their school, and the world in which they live. Theories pertaining to the roles and relationships within and between families, schools, and communities are introduced with an emphasis on enabling students to identify family needs and concerns and to use a variety of collaborative communication and problem-solving skills to assist families in finding the best available community resources to meet these needs. Students themselves explore various community resources that further the development of the child’s potential.

SOC 313 Social Implications of Medical Issues

3 Credits

An introductory course that provides learners with a basic foundation of human biology applicable to human service and health and human services providers. The course explores basic human biology and its relationship to selected socio-cultural domains that are grounded in Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model of Human Development.

SOC 315 Cross-Cultural Perspectives

3 Credits

Culture and politics in Europe, Latin America, the Arab world, India, East Asia, and other areas are examined. Emphasis is on viewing the world from the diverse perspectives of other cultures and political systems. Topics and regions vary.

SOC 320 Public Policy & Social Services

3 Credits

An examination of public policies and the social services they mandate. The major focus is on American government policy at all levels and the detailed content of social services. Some consideration of other nations and international agencies is offered. Policies and services pertaining to a variety of areas including urban life, poverty, health care, substance abuse, children, the aged, unemployment, and mental health are studied.

SOC 322 Sociological Aspects of Adulthood

3 Credits

Utilizing a multi-disciplinary approach, this course provides an introduction to the field of gerontology and its social implications. Social, psychological, and physical aspects of aging are overviewed as well as an exploration of the demographic shift taking place and the meaning and impact of the shift in terms of issues and policies arising from the graying of America. Other course topics include common aging changes/conditions, myths and stereotypes, the effects of health and illness on the individual, family, and society, and the impact of media, culture, and gender influences on aging.

SOC 326 Diversity & Aging

3 Credits

This course explores the diversity perspectives of culture, ethnicity, economic status, national origin, disability, gender, and sexual identity as related to aging. Emphasis is placed on the ethnic perspectives of aging across cultures.

SOC 333 Research Methods

3 Credits

This course examines quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods and associated data interpretation within the context of research, policy and practice within the social sciences. This course also examines the relationship between research, policy and/or theory. Students will examine types of data, measurement scales, hypotheses, sampling, probability, and varied research designs for research in the social sciences and related disciplines.

SOC 401 Engaging in Sociology

3 Credits

The course embraces the concept of ‘Engaging Sociology’ - a need for students to understand how to engage social/theoretical concepts into their daily lives in varied social environments, as well as through their employment. The course covers varied aspects of applied Sociology and social/theoretical concepts as a citizen in communities on a local, national, and global scale, as well as through employment as a Sociologist or in a related field. Prerequisites: SOC 101, SOC 301 and SOC 333 or ANT 351, ANT 353 and ANT 340.

SOC 402 Contemporary Social Problems & the Workplace

3 Credits

This course presents an analysis of major contemporary social problems, especially in the United States. Attention is given to the problems of poverty, racism, sexism, drug and alcohol abuse, and illiteracy, and their impact on the contemporary workplace. Consideration is given to diverse sociological perspectives regarding the causes, consequences, and solutions to these problems.

SOC 490 Social Science Capstone

3 Credits

This course requires students to reflect upon and synthesize the major insights gained in their study of the Social Sciences. A substantive paper is developed which requires students to critically analyze their experiences and knowledge in order to build leaders in the interdisciplinary field of Social Science. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the General Education Capstone course

SOC 5110 Sociological Theory

3 Credits

This course provides a systematic review of classical and contemporary sociological theory and its application to social situations and social problems. Students will learn about classical theorists, contemporary perspectives on society, and the social and organizational contexts in which these theories were developed.

SOC 5510 Sociology of Health and Medicine

3 Credits

Through this course, students will develop an understanding of social factors that influence health, wellness, and health care delivery systems. Course topics include social and demographic influences on health, social roles in prevention and illness, medical care institutions and their systems and structures, and the intersection between social policy and health.

SOC 5610 Structure & Function of Non-Profit & Government Organizations

3 Credits

In this course, the non-profit organization, the governmental organization, and their structure and function are examined. Students will become familiar with different types of non-profit and governmental organizations and their interrelated and often interdependent functions. Students will learn about the complexity of the public and non-profit sectors functioning as a dynamic system of interrelated yet separate organizations that are governed by social and fiscal policy and regulation.

SOC 5620 Sociology of Work in Contemporary Society

3 Credits

This course explores theories and concepts of work in contemporary society within and external to formal employment, and the intersection of work, gender, and family. Students will understand a broad range of experiences of work, drawing upon research on how temporal, socio-economic, gender and family roles, culture, and other factors shape work experiences. Students will also consider implications for policy and practice.

SOC 5630 Community Organizations and Analysis

3 Credits

This course explores the structure, function, and culture of community organizations, and the ways in which social scientists can use qualitative and quantitative data to inform decision-making, identify and address needs, and evaluate processes and outcomes. Students will read and analyze a variety of case studies and approaches that address these issues.

SOC 6910 Public Sociology Capstone

3 Credits

This capstone course addresses the application of sociological theory and research methods to social problems or policy concerns in organizations or communities. Students can either choose from a selection of case studies provided or identify a local organization with an applied or medical social problem or policy issue and develop a proposed solution that applies their learning through an integrative project plan that combines theory, research, and practice. Prerequisite: completion of all required coursework.

SPA Spanish

SPA 103 Beginning Spanish I

3 Credits

This course is designed for beginning Spanish speakers with no previous college course work in Spanish. The goal of this course is to enable students to acquire a basic mastery of the following four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The course will emphasize practice of grammar and communication skills.

SPA 104 Beginning Spanish II

3 Credits

Continued study of grammar and vocabulary of the Spanish language and study of the Spanish-speaking cultures. Emphasis on speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite: SPA 103 or departmental approval.

SPE Speech

SPE 103 Oral Communication

3 Credits
Students learn basic theory and practice of oral communication. Topics include language, listening, causes of communication breakdown, feedback, nonverbal communication, audience analysis, reasoning, organization and development of messages, and delivery strategies. Oral assignments may range from informative, persuasive, and ceremonial speaking to small group discussion and oral interpretation.

SRM Sports and Recreation Management

SRM 311 Sport Law

3 Credits

This course explores the legal structure of, and issues surrounding, amateur and professional sports leagues and associations. Included will be an examination of tort issues, risk management, sports agency, contract law, collective bargaining, gender issues, intellectual property, and antitrust law.

SRM 320 Organization and Administration of Sports & Recreation Management

3 Credits

Reviews the principles of organizational structure and behavior within sport organizations. Topics include organizational policies and procedures, organizational effectiveness, communication networks, and leadership values. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

SRM 325 Case Research in Sports & Recreation Management

3 Credits

Sports as a subject matter is very ancient and its marketing can be traced to even its earliest days. However, as an integral portion of contemporary society, successful sporting events or seasons generally require professional marketing efforts. Utilizing the principles of management, marketing and other relevant disciplines this course will use case studies, class discussions, and projects to enhance the student’s collective expertise in this area of Sports and Recreation Management. Prerequisites: GEN 499. This course must be taken last in the program. 

SRM 401 Sport Finance

3 Credits

The course examines the economic and financial environment in which the sport industry operates, with emphasis on financial decision-making, financial management, and current financial trends. The content identifies key stakeholders and their various interests in the financial success of sport operations and organizations. The students will explore sources of funding and revenue generation, financial controls and reporting, budgets, and the relationship between management principles and financial performance. Prerequisite: ACC 205.

SRM 410 Contemporary Issues in Sports Marketing & Management

3 Credits

Sport has become a major business enterprise in the United States and in much of the world. This course helps students understand the scope of the sport industry, to include identifying career opportunities in various segments of the sport industry. The course also examines the managerial process to include the functions of management, as well as the roles, skills, and attributes required of sport managers. Special attention is given to examining the unique characteristics of sport and the resulting social and ethical responsibilities of sport managers.

SRV Service Management

SRV 301 Introduction to Service Management

3 Credits

This course introduces management in the ‘intangible industries’ organization and addresses the central challenges presented by services organizations. The course also addresses the need for value creation through customers, the role of organizational leadership, and the role of services in modern society. 

SRV 312 Service Operations Management

3 Credits

This course is an introduction to service-related operations in a variety of business sectors and is studied through the shared aspect of their service elements, drawing upon service management theory to provide the academic framework. Students are introduced to operations management principles, and study the role of the operations manager within service organizations. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 332 Fundamentals of Hospitality

3 Credits

This course is a survey of the interrelated industries that comprise the hospitality and tourism industry. The course also introduces the student to the major concepts and components that representing the hotel, food and beverage, restaurant, recreation, theme parks, gaming, club management, convention and event planning, cruises, and tourism services industries. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 333 Resort Management

3 Credits

This course provides an overview of resort management and operations in the context of ski, golf, gaming, and other types of resorts. The basic principles of marketing, management, and development of a resort will be covered. The course includes a review of the history of the growth of resorts in the United States, expansion of resorts worldwide, and their operations and characteristics. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 340 Marketing in a Services Environment

3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the general principles of marketing and an in-depth study of services marketing theory. The concepts the student learns will enable students to develop the skills appropriate in an emerging service economy. The student will be exposed to the relationship between services marketing and the consumer experience. There will be opportunities for the student to apply services marketing theory in non-profit, mass-market retail, hospitality, and restaurant enterprise environments. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 346 Introduction to Restaurant Management

3 Credits

Identifies the crucial elements involved in the successful operation of a restaurant and how they interrelate. Students are taken through the process of creating a concept, developing a menu, budgeting and controlling costs, staffing the restaurant, purchasing food and equipment, bar and beverage management, daily operations, and developing a restaurant marketing plan. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 347 Sanitation & Safety

3 Credits

This course introduces the student to public health problems that relate to the hospitality industry. Topics include disease transmission through improper food handling and cooking, major types of micro-organisms, environmental conditions which encourage bacterial growth, fire prevention methods and safety, and sanitation rules and practices. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 423 Food & Beverage

3 Credits

This course is a study of the systems and techniques appropriate to manage food, beverage, and labor costs in restaurant and catering operations. Topics addressed include management, marketing, menu development, costs and pricing, quality assurance, production, and operational analysis. 

SRV 425 Event, Meeting, & Conference Management

3 Credits

In this course, students learn strategies to develop meaningful, well-organized conferences, meetings, and special events. The course addresses event logistics, facilities management, event compliance with ADA and other laws/regulations, contract negotiation, labor planning, and issues with food and beverage management. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 428 Non-Profit Agency Management

3 Credits

This course serves as an introduction to the non-profit organization and management. Discussions will focus on mission, leadership, marketing, community relations, fund development, staff supervision and professional development. 

SRV 429 Fiscal Management of Nonprofit Organizations

3 Credits

This course examines the principles and practices of financial management in nonprofit organizations. It is designed to teach students how to use financial information in the management of nonprofit organizations. The use of case studies and applied examples intends to make the course especially practical to those working in the nonprofit environment. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SRV 438 Menu Planning & Design

3 Credits

This course includes food service design concept including the menu, the location, and the type of clientele expected. Students will also demonstrate an understanding of menu layout, including selection, development, price structure, and restaurant style. Prerequisite: SRV 301.

SSC Social Science

SSC 101 Introduction to Social Science

3 Credits

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of social sciences and some of the disciplines that comprise this field, including anthropology, sociology, political science and history. These subject areas figure prominently in the Social Science major. In this course, students will learn important social science concepts and theoretical approaches, along with the research methods that social scientists use to study human behavior. Throughout the course and through a summative assignment, students will examine how social factors shape social behavior, and some of the consequences of current social problems.

SSC 320 Global Socioeconomic Perspectives

3 Credits

This course is an examination of global socioeconomic development in the context of globalization. Topics include population growth, natural resources, sustainable growth, migration, diplomacy, and the global consequences of inequality, poverty, and war. These topics are examined through the lens of social expectations, gender ideals, and economic justice.

SSC 330 Peacemaking: A Global Study of Conflict Resolution and Activism

3 Credits

An interdisciplinary study of peacemaking and activism with a focus on how they impact conflict resolution.Students examine thinking and behavior in response to social conflict such as aggression, threats, prejudice, avoidance, withdrawal, conformity, and obedience. Students study various strategies of peacemaking, activism, and negotiation and then apply these methods to in class activities.

SSC 340 Human Health & Global Environmental Change

3 Credits

This course analyzes the relationship between health and the environment and takes into account how health is influenced by natural and manmade environmental factors. Students will consider the history of the relationship between health and the global environment, addressing how groups in the past understood the connection and the actions they took to improve both. The course will also address contemporary theories that highlight how race, gender, and class influence the relationship between health and the environment. By concentrating on these factors, students will consider the negative and positive influences of the environment on human health as well as possible future concerns and issues that might emerge. 

SSC 350 eSociety: Science, Technology, and Society

3 Credits

The eSociety course focuses on the relationship between society, science, and technology and the social dynamics of knowledge production from a social science perspective. The course provides students with an understanding of how social values affect scientific research and technological innovation as well as the transformative impacts of technologies on society. Through discussions of key concepts and case studies, students will explore how particular scientific facts or technologies become accepted, how controversies are settled, and how science and scientists retain credibility and authority. Students will also engage with the social, ethical, and political consequences of technological developments. Prerequisite: SSC 101.